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New Post 6/6/2007 10:33 PM
  n8splyos
12 posts
10th Level Poster


History and Theory of Plyometrics 
Modified By 1511146@aruba.it  on 6/7/2007 7:58:26 PM)

Hello,

I am a graduate student and I am working on my orals paper. Part of my research is tracing the history of plyometrics and looking at the theory of plyometrics.  I have had very little luck especially finding information on the history of plyos.  I am wondering if anyone would have any available books or articles describing the beginnings of plyometrics and how it reached American training.  Any other information on the theory of plyometrics would be great as well.   thanks for your help.

 

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Nathan Rohlff (United States)

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New Post 6/7/2007 6:46 PM
  lugazineu.ricardo
19 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 
To begin, you should know that plyometrics is a wrong word, wrong method, wrong mean, period.

What exists in the history of training is jumping exercises and shock training.

It is terrible that in the year 2007, in a english language country, this generalization of methods and means and a wrong terminology still exists, leading to inadequated application, injuries and poor results.

Please, use bibliography authorized by Vedrkhoshansky or your study will contain serious mistakes in nthe methodology.

Ricardo Barros
Brazil
 
New Post 6/7/2007 6:47 PM
  lugazineu.ricardo
19 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 
Sorry, I wrote Verkhoshansky wrong.

Ricardo
Brazil
 
New Post 6/8/2007 2:13 AM
  n8splyos
12 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 

Gee Thanks Ricardo but here in America we do use the word plyometrics and not shock training.  however, I do not think  your goal for your post was to help me out.  That is why I would like to direct my message solely to Prof.Verkhoshansky if possible.   I would like to find his work translated in english somewhere.  It is very difficult for me to find, that is why I am asking the creater of plyometrics or shock training for his decision whether or not he would like to tell me the time period and/or the evolutionary period of this form of training.  I cannot find anything in English about this at all.  I thank you Prof. Verkhoshansky in advance for your time and work.

 

Nate

USA

 
New Post 6/8/2007 2:22 AM
  James Smith
22 posts
www.powerdevelopmentinc.com
9th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 
I agree with Ricardo.

pliometric simply refers to the regime of muscle activity in which a rapid prestretch faclitiates the subsequent explosive contraction.

As with most training concepts that have been misunderstood or perverted here in the US, somehow the word pliometric has become synonymous with various forms of jumping exercises. Furthermore, many under qualified coaches and trainers throw the word around as if it possesses some sort of lore and mystique.

It is my understanding that Fred Wilt (an American) introduced what westerners know as 'pliometrics' into the training of athletes here in the US. Although Dr. Verkhoshansky has stated that Mr. Wilt did not utilize an organized approach to integrating the means in any type of logical sequence.

Dr. Verkhoshansky would surely be the expert to elucidate the history in its greatest detai.
 
New Post 6/8/2007 2:23 AM
  James Smith
22 posts
www.powerdevelopmentinc.com
9th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 
I agree with Ricardo.

pliometric simply refers to the regime of muscle activity in which a rapid prestretch faclitiates the subsequent explosive contraction.

As with most training concepts that have been misunderstood or perverted here in the US, somehow the word pliometric has become synonymous with various forms of jumping exercises. Furthermore, many under qualified coaches and trainers throw the word around as if it possesses some sort of lore and mystique.

It is my understanding that Fred Wilt (an American) introduced what westerners know as 'pliometrics' into the training of athletes here in the US. Although Dr. Verkhoshansky has stated that Mr. Wilt did not utilize an organized approach to integrating the means in any type of logical sequence.

Dr. Verkhoshansky would surely be the expert to elucidate the history in its greatest detail.

James Smith (United States)
 
New Post 6/8/2007 10:16 AM
  Dan
58 posts
6th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 
 n8splyos wrote

Gee Thanks Ricardo but here in America we do use the word plyometrics and not shock training.  

Nate

USA

 

Nate, the guys are right. In the western world, even in a big part oif Europe, the word "plyometric" is too loosely used. The confusion is deep, and its accentuated by a lot of popular books

written dealing with "plyometrics" which have a lot of jump exercises and exercises which have too long amortization phases .

 
New Post 6/8/2007 5:17 PM
  n8splyos
12 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 

Ok thanks guys, so basically all of america is writing books about nonsense then.   Because everything I read from so-called strength professionals in america use that terminology.  Whatever the jargan is, I would like to learn more.   I do need as many details as possible about the origination of this type of training and I need to have a respectable source to cite in my paper.  With all due respect, I cannot cite forum chatter.  Don't blame or attack me for terminology that our professionals use.   I would love to hear Prof. Verkhoshansy's response on the hisotry/theory of what is shock training.  Maybe my experience here will be very helpful.  I do agree that this type of training is misused here by many people....thus, one of the reasons for writing my paper.  I read some work of Wilt but didn't realize he was the first American to introduce this training method to the USA.

 

While we on the subject is complex training correct terminology and who was the first person to introduce this blend of weight training and shock training?

 
New Post 6/8/2007 5:18 PM
  n8splyos
12 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 
 n8splyos wrote

Ok thanks guys, so basically all of america is writing books about nonsense then.   Because everything I read from so-called strength professionals in america use that terminology.  Whatever the jargan is, I would like to learn more.   I do need as many details as possible about the origination of this type of training and I need to have a respectable source to cite in my paper.  With all due respect, I cannot cite forum chatter.  Don't blame or attack me for terminology that our professionals use.   I would love to hear Prof. Verkhoshansy's response on the hisotry/theory of what is shock training.  Maybe my experience here will be very helpful.  I do agree that this type of training is misused here by many people....thus, one of the reasons for writing my paper.  I read some work of Wilt but didn't realize he was the first American to introduce this training method to the USA.

 

While we on the subject is complex training correct terminology and who was the first person to introduce this blend of weight training and shock training?

nate usa

nate

 
New Post 6/8/2007 6:36 PM
  Dan
58 posts
6th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 

Read SSTM number 2 for an overview of complex method of training. You can downlaod it from this site. The magazine also contain a very good overview of the shock method.

Not all USA coaches uses the word "plyometric" loosely. An example is James Smith which posted in this thread, a man well versed in eastern methodologies. I know a several others , ppl which do not use the word "plyometric" anymore to refere to the shock method. I bleieve that in USA the term "plyometric" was initially coined to describe the shock method, as developed at the end of the 1950s  in Russia.  The term was later diluted and its used today in popular literature to refere to a vast set of jumping , rebounds, medicine ball pases,  which are anything but the shock method. Just check "jumping into plyometrics" by Chu to see what the term become.

 
New Post 6/8/2007 6:37 PM
  Dan
58 posts
6th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 

Dan Partelly

Romania

 
New Post 6/9/2007 1:03 AM
  n8splyos
12 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 
Thanks Dan for your help and leads to other resources.   --Main Features of a Modern Scientific Sports Training Theory-- is this the SSTM article you were referring to?-->  #2, under the english articles?   Coincidently, I also read an article from professor Verkhoshansy today about the overview of plyometrics and it discussed what others have expressed on here, so I have a published article to cite from.  I am still looking forward to see what the Professor's response is as well.  I hope he has the time to respond.
 
New Post 6/9/2007 1:05 AM
  n8splyos
12 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 

 n8splyos wrote
Thanks Dan for your help and leads to other resources.   --Main Features of a Modern Scientific Sports Training Theory-- is this the SSTM article you were referring to?-->  #2, under the english articles?   Coincidently, I also read an article from professor Verkhoshansy today about the overview of plyometrics and it discussed what others have expressed on here, so I have a published article to cite from.  I am still looking forward to see what the Professor's response is as well.  I hope he has the time to respond.

 

nate

USA

 
New Post 6/9/2007 4:21 PM
  dousey
6 posts
No Ranking


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 
nate

im not sure of there is anything specific to your needs but the following site has many excellent articles

http://www.athleticscoaching.ca/default.aspx?pid=1&spid=43

jamie
oz
 
New Post 6/9/2007 5:55 PM
  n8splyos
12 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 

Thank you Jamie!  I do appreciate more leads.  I will check this website out.   Lots of nice people on here!  Take care!!

 

Nate

 

USA

 
New Post 6/10/2007 1:30 AM
  Prof. Verkhoshansky
245 posts
www.verkhoshansky.com
1st Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 

Dear Nathan Rohlff,

what Ricardo Barros, James Smith and Dun Partelly wrote about this issue is correct I can’t add more. Their answers about the “History and Theory of Plyometrics” gave me awareness that at least the professional coach understood my ideas and they didn’t get confuse with a wrong terminology.

The history and theory of Shock method is presented in my Italian book “Mezzi e metodi per l’allenamento della forza esplosiva. Tutto sul metodo d’urto” Socetà Stampa sportiva, 1997 (160 pages). This book was translated in Spain with a title that I don’t like, “Todo Sobre el Metodo Pliometrico” Editorial Paidotribo, Barcelona. For this reason I think that this text gave a good contribution to the confusion.

I and my daughter Natalia have started its translation. I hope this book will be ready in the next months.

I agree with Jamie Douse about the site of Canadian Athletics Coaching Centre, it is a very good site full of good articles and information.

Best wishes for your studies,

Yuri Verkhoshansky

 
New Post 6/11/2007 11:01 PM
  Dan
58 posts
6th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 
 n8splyos wrote

 n8splyos wrote
Thanks Dan for your help and leads to other resources.   --Main Features of a Modern Scientific Sports Training Theory-- is this the SSTM article you were referring to?-->  #2, under the english articles?   Coincidently, I also read an article from professor Verkhoshansy today about the overview of plyometrics and it discussed what others have expressed on here, so I have a published article to cite from.  I am still looking forward to see what the Professor's response is as well.  I hope he has the time to respond.

 

nate

USA

 

Nate,

 

the SSTM journal number 2 is in a separate category on this website than the "english articles"

SSTM of March 2007 - SUPERMETHODS OF SPECIAL PHYSICAL PREPARATION FOR THE HIGH CLASS ATHLETE

Is what you should download.

 

Dan Partelly,Romania

 

 

 

 
New Post 6/13/2007 4:08 PM
  n8splyos
12 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 

Thanks,

I was hoping for just a brief writing about how it originated.  All this argument about the terminology is irrelevant to me.   No one answered my question other than arguing about the name of it.  I will have to wait for the translation I guess.  I guess since I use the word plyometrics I am a non professional.  Quite frankly, most everyone in this forum has been very rude.

 

 

Thanks Dan for the Article.

 
New Post 6/14/2007 2:24 AM
  lugazineu.ricardo
19 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 
Sorry, but my itention was to help you so you could study and read in the "right places".
I think if you really want to make a good job, the first thing would be to know what you are looking for. I do not agree that the terminology is irrelevant.
Sport Strength Training Metodology is a very serious thing to people in this forum. No one question can be answered in a simple way. There is science behind each exercise, set and exercise. It is not a general fitness forum where people ask things like "How can I gain muscle".
Dr. Verkhoshansky is a Professor, a Scientist, a Coach, a man that elevated the signification of the word "Strength" and he and his work must have all the respect.
If I was rude, I am sorry, it was not my intention. But how you asked and how you reffer to "plyometrics" was rude too. When I started to study SSTM years ago, and until today, I had to read in english, spanish, german, itallian and even in russian with a dictionary by my side. Sometimes I spent months to understand a single paragraph in russian. But all the effort was ok because Verkhoshansky´s work is like the Holy Bible of Strength.

Ricardo Barros
Brazil
 
New Post 6/15/2007 8:12 PM
  n8splyos
12 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: History and Theory of Plyometrics 

 lugazineu.ricardo wrote
Sorry, but my itention was to help you so you could study and read in the "right places".
I think if you really want to make a good job, the first thing would be to know what you are looking for. I do not agree that the terminology is irrelevant.
Sport Strength Training Metodology is a very serious thing to people in this forum. No one question can be answered in a simple way. There is science behind each exercise, set and exercise. It is not a general fitness forum where people ask things like "How can I gain muscle".
Dr. Verkhoshansky is a Professor, a Scientist, a Coach, a man that elevated the signification of the word "Strength" and he and his work must have all the respect.
If I was rude, I am sorry, it was not my intention. But how you asked and how you reffer to "plyometrics" was rude too. When I started to study SSTM years ago, and until today, I had to read in english, spanish, german, itallian and even in russian with a dictionary by my side. Sometimes I spent months to understand a single paragraph in russian. But all the effort was ok because Verkhoshansky´s work is like the Holy Bible of Strength.

Ricardo Barros
Brazil

 

Thanks Ricardo.  It just seems I am being attacked for using a wrong term.  I do not se how I was being rude by asking for help, evidently the term "plyometrics" is a sin in this room.  I have worked with numerous professionals in this field and they all used that term.  So, do not fault me with using it. I asked for help/suggestions in this forum to learn and find more information.  I did not join it to argue or make enemies.  It's not my fault most americans dont use the "shock training" terminology, with all due respect I have never heard anyone refer to it before.  But if that is the original term for plyometrics or if its different than plyometrics I will make note of it.  I ordered the writings that the professor suggested and I will have them translated.  Maybe that will give me more of an insight to what I am looking for.  Most books on this subject are very brief, I would like learn more about the history.

 
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